NLIS Early Warning Status

Early Warning (EW) is a status within the National Livestock Identification System (NLIS) database that is automatically assigned to a property carrying a high-risk animal or animals.

It is one of several statuses that can be assigned to a Property Identification Code (PIC) within the database. The EW status does not identify what the status is for, or which specific animals are high-risk.

The EW status helps monitor and manage food safety and biosecurity risk along the entire value chain. It gives livestock buyers and agents a heads up around potential risk by flagging that the PIC may have high risk animals associated with it. The buyer or agent is then able to contact the vendor and seek more information about whether a high-risk animal is in a consignment.

An individual animal is given a ‘device-based status’ against its NLIS tag or bolus when it has a known disease or residue issue that presents a food safety or biosecurity risk, and requires specific management on-farm, or at feedlots, saleyards and processors.

The status is assigned by a Commonwealth or State Department, a vet or the Integrity Systems Company (ISC) via the NLIS (depending on the type of status) who then informs the producer.

These device-based statuses automatically trigger an EW status on the PIC where the animal resides in the NLIS database.

 

 Device-based statuses that trigger the EW PIC status

Status

Reason Assigned

AV (AV1)

Assigned to cattle that have been vaccinated against anthrax

DOI (DN2)

Assigned to devices of interest to the States and Territories

IMPO (IM1)

Assigned to cattle imported from country where BSE has been diagnosed

JD (JD2)              

Assigned to cattle determined by a State or Territory authority to be a Johne’s disease clinical case

LEAD (PB1, PB2)

Assigned to cattle placed under movement restrictions due to lead residues (PB1)

LPA (NL2)           

Assigned to cattle that have moved to an LPA Accredited PIC from a non-LPA accredited PIC with an organochlorine status and have resided on the PIC for less than 6 months

NARM (K1F, K1V, K3)

Assigned to cattle where antimicrobial residue testing is required

NORM (N1F, N1V, N2F, N2V)

Assigned to cattle where organochlorine residue testing is required

RAM (F1, F2, F3)

Assigned to cattle exposed to restricted animal material (RAM)

 

It is a vendor’s responsibility to disclose any risk associated with animals for sale. This includes answering yes to question 5 on the LPA NVD (question 4 on EU NVD), while your PIC has an EW status and for 6 months from its removal (if the EW status has been triggered by a food safety concern).

 

NVD EW

 

 

 
The EW status will remain active until the high risk animal/s are slaughtered, or until the device status duration expires or is removed.

It is a buyer’s responsibility to assess any risks associated with the purchase of livestock, and to determine whether or not they will accept those risks.

When will EW be available all NLIS account holders?

From 13 January 2020, EW status will be visible to all account holders within the NLIS database.

Tools & Resources

Buyer FAQs

Early Warning (EW) is a status within the NLIS database that is assigned to a property carrying a high-risk animal or animals.

It is one of several ‘Property Identification Code (PIC)-based statuses’ assigned within the database.
The EW status does not identify what the status is for or which specific animals are high-risk.

The EW status helps monitor and manage food safety and biosecurity risk along the entire supply chain. It gives livestock buyers and agents a heads up around potential risk by flagging that the PIC may have high risk animals (ie chemical residue or disease) associated with it. The buyer or agent is then able to contact the vendor and seek more information about whether a high-risk animal is in a consignment.

An individual animal is given a ‘device-based status’ against its NLIS tag or bolus when it has a known disease or residue issue that presents a food safety or biosecurity risk and requires specific management on-farm, or at feedlots, saleyards and processors.

Depending on the risk, the status is assigned by the Commonwealth or State Department, a vet or the Integrity System Company via the NLIS database. The producer is then informed.

These device-based statuses automatically trigger an EW status on the PIC where the animal resides in the NLIS database. The device-based statuses that trigger the EW status are:

• AV (AV1) – Assigned to cattle that have been vaccinated against anthrax
• DOI (DN2) – Assigned to devices of interest to the States and Territories
• IMPO (IM1) – Assigned to cattle imported from country where BSE has been diagnosed
• JD (JD2) – Assigned to cattle determined by a State or Territory authority to be a Johne’s disease clinical case
• LEAD (PB1, PB2) – Assigned to cattle placed under movement restrictions due to lead residues (PB1)
• LPA (NL2) – Assigned to cattle that have moved to an LPA Accredited PIC from a non-LPA accredited PIC with an organochlorine status and have resided on the PIC for less than 6 months
• NARM (K1F, K1V, K3) – Assigned to cattle where antimicrobial residue testing is required
• NORM (N1F, N1V, N2F, N2V) – Assigned to cattle where organochlorine residue testing is required
• RAM (F1, F2, F3) – Assigned to cattle exposed to restricted animal material (RAM)

A device-based status is assigned to the NLIS tag or bolus of an individual animal that presents a food safety or biosecurity risk. This status remains active until the animal is slaughtered or until the status duration expires or is removed. 

A buyer can investigate the consignment’s status further by either:

• using the PIC register on the central NLIS database to search for a specific PIC
• contacting the vendor to seek clarification that there are no high risk animal/s in the consignment (in a private sale)
• asking the selling agent to seek clarification that there are no high risk animal/s in the consignment

The pre-sale catalogue from the selling agents should outline any EW statuses for that days’ sale.  If a pre-sale catalogue is not provided, you may request all devices be run for a status check by the saleyard operator.

A vendor must let potential buyers know if there are high risk animals in the consignment. It is the buyer’s responsibility to assess those risks associated with purchasing the livestock and determine whether they accept those risks. 

Permission can be granted to other parties to access information on the NLIS database on your behalf via a Third Party Account (e.g. agent, family member, contractor).

Ask the vendor or agent selling the stock to confirm that the consignment does not include any high risk animals. 

Seller FAQs

Depending on the risk, the Commonwealth or State Department, a vet or the Integrity Systems Company apply a status to a specific device. You will be notified by them at this time. The EW status is then automatically applied within the NLIS database to the PIC where the device is located.

If the high-risk animal is moved to a different PIC, that PIC also automatically has an EW status assigned to it within the NLIS database.

The PIC EW status is disclosed to potential buyers and selling agent when they query the NLIS database so that they are aware of any potential risks associated with the livestock that they intend to purchase and can manage those risks appropriately, particularly if the livestock are to be processed.

Not necessarily. The EW status is shown against the PIC if and when the saleyard or agent perform their pre-sale checks. The saleyard or agent may contact you directly for further information or they may scan the animals in the consignment to determine if any animals carry individual statuses. If they do, then this information may also be provided on a pre-sale catalogue.

Sellers of livestock are obliged to disclose if they are selling a high-risk animal. Likewise, agents and saleyards are obliged to disclose relevant information about livestock and the properties they are consigned from to potential buyers.

If you have an EW status on your PIC, you should work with your agent or saleyard ahead of the sale, confirm whether the consignment includes a high risk animal and provide the NLIS device numbers of those animals to the agent, saleyard or buyer.

The agent or saleyard may then choose to include this specific information about the individual animal/s in the pre-sale catalogue.

The EW status will be removed from your PIC once animals with a high risk status on their NLIS tag or bolus move off your PIC, the animal is recorded as deceased or the duration of the status is finished.

You can provide buyers with details of any high risk animals in the consignment, or provide a list of the NLIS tag numbers of each animal in the consignment prior to sale so that they can check if there are any statuses attached to them. You will also provide buyers with the assurances they require by accurately completing the NVD and declaring any livestock that may pose a food safety or biosecurity risk. 

When completing the NVD, you must declare all animals that have a device-based status on their NLIS tag or bolus by providing detail at Q9 on the NVD.

You also must tick yes to question 5 on the LPA NVD (question 4 on EU NVD), while your PIC has an EW status and for 6 months from its removal.

 NVD EW

 

 

You must notify the selling agent who will be acting on your behalf. This will ensure full transparency through the selling process and allow any potential food safety or biosecurity risk to be managed.

If you have an EW status on your PIC, you should provide full transparency and confirm with the saleyards, your agent or buyer that there are no high risk animals in the consignment. Following that, it will be business as usual.

The EW status will remain attached to your PIC until animals with high risk device-based statuses move off the PIC, are recorded as deceased, or have their individual device-based status removed. The setting and removal of individual device-based statuses is usually the responsibility of the states and territories. Some statuses are also time bound, so will automatically be removed after a set period of time. 

Saleyards & Agents FAQs

Livestock consigned from an EW status PIC can be sold under the usual terms but this should be declared on the NVD. Saleyards and agents should check with the consignor whether any livestock in the consignment carry a high risk status, or scan the animals in the consignment to check for device-based statuses and include this information in the pre-sale catalogue. Animals with a Lead (Pb), and unknown exposure status need special treatment.  

There is no need to identify the EW status on pens at the sale. While the vendor should alert the agent or potential buyer of any high risk animals in the lot, the EW status is an additional tool for buyers to better understand if they need to conduct any additional enquiries regarding the animals in the lot prior to purchase.

Saleyards and agents should check with the consignor whether any livestock in the consignment carry a high risk status, or work with the saleyard operator to scan the animals in the consignment to check for device statuses and may include this information in the pre-sale catalogue.

No, it is not expected that all animals are scanned prior to sale as not all saleyards have the ability. However, the vendor should inform the saleyard where their PIC they are consigning livestock for sale from has an EW status and saleyards and agents must check with the vendor whether any livestock in the consignment carry a high risk status.

If the vendor does not know, and if facilities exist, agents and saleyards can scan the animals in the consignment to check for device statuses and include this information in the pre-sale catalogue.  

This is managed the same way as a usual sale is run and every saleyard will have a different process. 

Agents are encouraged to know the PIC status of consignments prior to sale and to share this information with their clients. An agent can access the NLIS to ascertain whether the selling PIC has an EW status.

However, an agent cannot check the individual device-based statuses of a consignment unless they have been assigned third party authority by the seller. The saleyard superintendent has the ability to check this from the list of individual devices. 

Producers must identify on the NVD any animals that have a high risk status that pose a risk to food safety (question 9 on the NVD). They do not have to outline the EW status on the NVD if the consignment does not include any high risk animals.

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